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  Here is an English-language sentence, in the context of a dialogue, consisting of just five words, and having least five distinct meanings. The word that is italicized and in bold is the one…

Ajarn Donald‘s insight:

Here is an English-language sentence, in the context of a dialogue, consisting of just five words, and having least five distinct meanings. The word that is italicized and in bold is the one to stress in each variant of the sentence.

You said that to her? (I could imagine almost anybody else saying that to her, but certainly not you. I am stunned.)You said that to her? (You actually had the nerve to say that to her face, rather than writing to her or letting her know by some indirect means? That must have taken some nerve!)You said that to her? (Of all the things you could have said to her,  you chose that one? Those specific words? Are you crazy or something?)You said that to her? (Am I understanding this correctly? You didn’t say that about her, to someone else, but actually to her? Why would you do a thing like that?You said that to her? (Of all the people you could have said that to, you said it to her? Don’t you realize how serious the repercussions will be?)

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